history - Bits & Pieces

History - Bits & Pieces

 

A Horse Drawn Milk Cart...

provides a link with a bygone era. The one on display was owned by Alexander Paterson who ran a cane and dairy farming property on Fairymead Road and Paddy’s Island from circa 1910. The dairy known as “Glencorse Dairy” was one of a number of dairy farms which supplied fresh milk twice daily to households in the Bundaberg district, up until the mid 1940’s. In many cases the dairy farmer’s family both hand milked the cows and delivered the milk. Cows were milked twice daily, seven days a week.


Eventually the horse drawn milk cart was superceded by the motor vehicle. Refrigeration became widely available and pasteurisation of milk was introduced. Early 1950 electricity was connected to rural areas, electric milking machines were acquired and milk could be stored in refrigerated vats in the dairy overnight. The milk was delivered to the Port Curtis Butter Factory where it was pasteurised and bottled. In later years bulk milk carriers visited the farm each day to collect and transport milk to the factory.

The World Quilt...

is a handmade quilt of embroidered squares. Marguerite Rule (nee Vuichoud) was a young girl in 1927 who subscribed to an American newspaper called “The Christian Science Monitor”.  She was asked by an American correspondent, to the journal, to embroider a piece of cloth for an autographed quilt that the correspondent was making in Oklahoma. Marguerite decided to do the same and make a similar quilt herself. Thus the American tradition of friendship quilts carried over to Australia. At the tender age of 14 Marguerite started the quilt and finished it at the age of 20. The quilt, approximately 1.5m.  square, is comprised of 59 embroidered squares each 15 cms. Square with a larger square in the centre with an embroidered map of the World with Marguerite’s name and year.


Being an avid movie fan, Marguerite wrote, and sent s 6 inch linen square to all of her favourite stars. Most of them kindly sent back the square with their autograph in ink. Marguerite said “I had to soak out the blots with sour milk or lemon juice.  After I had embroidered in stem stitch, my father drew symbols on them for me. I received autographed squares from Mary Pickford, Amy Johnson, Charles Kingsford Smith, Don Bradman, Gladys Moncrieff, Maurice Chevalier and Mary Grant Bruce (author of the Billabong” books) to name but a few. I kept sending to famous people of 1930, including several from Richard E. Byrd’s Antarctic expedition. Until I had enough squares to make a bed sized quilt in June 1933.

On display...

in the Bundaberg & District Historical Museum is a Cyclops designed pram made specially to hold 4 babies.  The Lucke Quads 12th July 1955 was a significant day in Bundaberg’s history. The Lucke quads were born to parents Arthur and Agnes Lucke. Bundaberg’s news went worldwide. The quads, 2 boys and 2 girls were born between 9.50 am and 12.25pm with Dr. Eric Schmidt in attendance. The boys, named Eric and Kevin, were first born then the girls, Jennifer and Veronica arrived. In the display visitors can also see an early humidicrib similar to the ones the quads were placed in after birth.

Molly DeGunst...

was born in Bundaberg on 28th June 1905. She attended South State School and Bundaberg High School. Molly began her musical studies at the age of 13 years with local teacher, Ivy Marles (Mrs. J.W. Kendall). For three years she trained with Garcia School of Music in Sydney. Her debut, in 1926 at the Conservatorium of Music, Molly returned to Bundaberg to perform in “Il Torvatore” with the Del Rigo Grand Opera Company.


Molly moved to London in 1936 becoming a leading dramatic soprano at Sadlers Wells. In 1939 Molly married Gordon Kingsley Lark, an electrical engineer of London. She passed away peacefully at her home in England on 29th June 1994, aged 89 years.